Meet the bunnies!

After 7 weeks of lov­ing Lula & Bubba’s babies, they have final­ly grown up enough to be able to tell them apart. As I announced in an ear­li­er post, we fig­ured out a few weeks ago that we had three boys and one girl. Since we are now able to dis­tin­guish the black ones from each oth­er, I asked David to tell me which black one is a girl. After “exam­in­ing” all the bun­nies — in a man­ner which I imag­ine they didn’t appre­ci­ate — David announced all of the bun­nies are boys. Then he shrugged his shoul­ders and said “I don’t know!?! It all looks the same??!!”

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I sent him back to baby bun­ny gen­der iden­ti­fi­ca­tion (( BBGI)) school — which he didn’t exact­ly appre­ci­ate either. After anoth­er les­son in BBGI, he deter­mined there are in fact 2 girls and 2 boys!! I am super excit­ed beca­sue that means these sweet lit­tle social crea­tures can be sep­a­rat­ed into pairs — the sis­ters can live togeth­er and the broth­ers can live togeth­er!

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So let me intro­duce my bun­nies to you:

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Meet Ruby Grace. Ruby Grace is one of two sweet black females. With gor­geous long-haired ears, she real­ly stands out in the lit­ter and we sure love her. She is the only long ear haired bun­ny we have. She loves to be held gen­tly but firm­ly and loves lay­ing in the shade on the cool ground.

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Meet Rupert. The man, the myth — the leg­end. Being our only sil­ver & fawn col­ored bun­ny — he is a real doll. So sweet and docile — I could just stick him in my pock­et and take him every­where. He is a friend to all of his sib­lings, always look­ing for a cud­dle. Today he had his first dig in the yard, cov­er­ing him­self with dirt. Typ­i­cal boy!

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Meet Pene­lope. She is a lady for sure! She likes to be held and sung to, but also likes to lay on the cool ground. She also like to be near her sis­ter and broth­ers.

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Meet Jol­ly Ranch­er. Jol­ly Ranch­er is a trick bun­ny! From an ear­ly age, he per­fect­ed the “pulling the bun­ny out of the hat” rou­tine. His most recent mag­ic trick to pre­form was the dis­ap­pear­ing act. Now you see him in his play yard…now you don’t. We still can’t fig­ure out how he did it, but twice in 10 min­utes he was hop­ping on the out­side of the play yard while his sib­lings were per­fect­ly con­tent to play safe­ly inside. Jol­ly Ranch­er is the only black male but is dis­tin­guish­able from his sis­ters by sev­er­al rust brown spots on his back.

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We are hap­py to keep these bun­nies, but were hope­ful to sell them so that we could con­tin­ue enjoy­ing the mirac­u­lous won­der of new lit­ters to come. How­ev­er, these cuties have yet to find a new home. If you are con­sid­er­ing own­ing a cou­ple of our bun­nies — I would love to tell you all the things we love about hav­ing these pets.

  • They are very easy to care for. A light brush­ing & nail trim every few weeks is all the groom­ing they require. The brush­ing isn’t real­ly nec­es­sary but it keeps them used to being “messed with”. Their nails have been trimmed sev­er­al times — by me. It is easy to do with pet nail trim­mers & I will teach you how ((for no extra charge, haha)).
  • Ear mites are the biggest health con­cern for bun­nies. I have already giv­en them their first pre­ven­ta­tive treat­ment & they seemed to enjoy it! It was sim­ple too — just gen­tly dab a baby oil soaked cot­ton ball in their ears, allow­ing the oil to run into the del­i­cate out­er ear and canal. **Don’t stick any­thing in their ear.**
  • Rab­bit feed and tim­o­thy hay are diet sta­ples — but these guys are also pros at eat­ing all the left­over fruit and veg­gie bits that come of your kitchen.
  • They love leafy greens, toma­toes, cold water­mel­on rinds and car­rots of course!
  • These sweet cud­dly guys have taught our heard count­less lessons regard­ing the Lord’s cre­ation and our respon­si­bil­i­ty to care for that cre­ation with kind­ness, depend­abil­i­ty and gen­tle­ness.
  • The kid­dos have learned A LOT about the “birds & the bees” in a very sim­ple, G-rat­ed sort of way. With three grow­ing boys, teach­ing those types of lessons can be a strug­gle — but our bun­nies made it a breeze!
  • Bun­ny manure is a great addi­tion to com­post — and a real boost to the gar­den!

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Think­ing about a bun­ny? How about tak­ing two?? They are social pets who real­ly thrive on dai­ly atten­tion. Two bun­nies are real­ly bet­ter than one. They care for each oth­er and pro­vide that atten­tion that own­ers may not be able to give as much as a bun­ny needs. The trick is — they have to be raised togeth­er or else aggres­sion issues can occur. Sib­lings of the same sex are they way to go!

 

 

In true show & tell form: "I am open for questions & comments"

 
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