The Perfect Chili

Once cold weath­er strikes, a com­mon recipe request I receive is “chili”. Sur­pris­ing­ly, I have nev­er tak­en the time to write out a chili recipe — rather, I have just dumped, stirred and tast­ed until it hits all the notes I love. But recent­ly, I decid­ed to slow down and write out my recipe. I’m excit­ed to final­ly be able share it (and all my secrets) with you!

I love a good, spicy (but not 5-Alarm spicy), hearty, meaty bowl of chili. It real­ly is one of the things I call com­fort food. Chili was a meal my mom fre­quent­ly made dur­ing the cold months. I loved how it’s spicy aro­ma filled our home and with­out ask­ing — I knew exact­ly what was for din­ner.

She always made plen­ty so that left­overs were assured — and chili left­overs are even bet­ter than chili first’s — don’t you agree?!

For my recipe, I have a long list of spices and ingre­di­ents — but don’t get scared! This chili is lit­er­al­ly dump and go. So, once every­thing is in the pot, you can just pop it in the oven and walk away.

Okay, now let’s talk chili! There are so many types of chili:

  • sweet
  • spicy
  • beans
  • no beans
  • beef
  • pork
  • chick­en
  • turkey
  • veg­e­tar­i­an
  • soupy
  • thick
  • and lets not even start talk­ing about white — or green!

All are deli­cious for sure, but my idea of what makes the per­fect chili is a com­bi­na­tion of spicy, a hint of sweet, a whis­per of heat, hearty, with beans and cubed chuck roast.

And here’s how I achieve that type of chili ::

Start off by brown­ing 3–4 lb cubed chuck roast in a large (7–9 qt.) Dutch oven. Once all sides are browned, add fine­ly chopped cel­ery and onions. Con­tin­ue cook­ing until the onions and cel­ery are ten­der and translu­cent.

Next, add dried spices, brown sug­ar, toma­toes, wine, beef broth, water, fine­ly diced poblano pep­per, dried beans, salt and pep­per AND the *sur­prise ingre­di­ent* cocoa pow­der.

The cocoa pow­der does 3 impor­tant things for this chili. First it gives the chili a gor­geous­ly deep, cooked all-day col­or. Next, it gives the chili an uniden­ti­fi­able depth of fla­vor that’s both com­plex and com­fort­ing. And last, the addi­tion of cocoa pow­der cre­ates the per­fect hearty, slight­ly thick chili con­sis­ten­cy I love so much.

So, add the long list of ingre­di­ents to the pot, give it a good stir, cov­er and place in the oven on 250° to 300° for 4–6 hours.

 

It’s okay to check the chili about halfway through the cook­ing process because you want to make sure the beans still have enough cook­ing liq­uid as they con­tin­ue to cook and soft­en.

Once the beans are ten­der, taste the chili and add addi­tion­al salt and pep­per if need­ed.

Serve with a gar­nish of cheese and sour cream — maybe even a hand­ful of Fritos and pre­pare to please your crowd with the per­fect chili!

The Per­fect Chili
Serves 12
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
6 hr
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
6 hr
415 calo­ries
33 g
119 g
8 g
49 g
3 g
419 g
1443 g
6 g
0 g
5 g
Nutri­tion Facts
Serv­ing Size
419g
Serv­ings
12
Amount Per Serv­ing
Calo­ries 415
Calo­ries from Fat 76
% Dai­ly Val­ue *
Total Fat 8g
13%
Sat­u­rat­ed Fat 3g
15%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyun­sat­u­rat­ed Fat 1g
Monoun­sat­u­rat­ed Fat 4g
Cho­les­terol 119mg
40%
Sodi­um 1443mg
60%
Total Car­bo­hy­drates 33g
11%
Dietary Fiber 8g
31%
Sug­ars 6g
Pro­tein 49g
Vit­a­min A
15%
Vit­a­min C
35%
Cal­ci­um
9%
Iron
43%
* Per­cent Dai­ly Val­ues are based on a 2,000 calo­rie diet. Your Dai­ly Val­ues may be high­er or low­er depend­ing on your calo­rie needs.
Ingre­di­ents
  1. 3–4 lb cubed and trimmed chuck roast
  2. 1 medi­um white onion, fine­ly diced
  3. 2 cel­ery stalks, fine­ly diced
  4. 1 poblano pep­per, fine­ly diced (option­al)
  5. 1 lb dried pin­to type beans, rinsed
  6. 2–3 t Mex­i­can oregano
  7. 2 t cumin
  8. 4 T Hatch red chili pow­der
  9. 4 T sweet papri­ka
  10. 3 T (heap­ing) cocoa pow­der
  11. 2 t gar­lic pow­der
  12. 2 t black pep­per
  13. 4 t kosher salt, more to taste
  14. 3 T light brown sug­ar
  15. 1 4 oz can toma­to paste
  16. 1 20 oz can crushed toma­toes
  17. 10 oz spicy toma­to juice
  18. 3–4 c water*
  19. 32 oz beef broth
  20. 6 oz red wine
Instruc­tions
  1. Start off by brown­ing 3–4 lb cubed chuck roast in a large (7–9 qt.) Dutch oven. Once all sides are browned, add fine­ly chopped cel­ery and onions. Con­tin­ue cook­ing until the onions and cel­ery are ten­der and translu­cent.
  2. Next, add dried spices, brown sug­ar, toma­toes, wine, beef broth, water, fine­ly diced poblano pep­per, dried beans, salt and pep­per AND the *sur­prise ingre­di­ent* cocoa pow­der.
  3. The cocoa pow­der does 3 impor­tant things for this chili. First it gives the chili a gor­geous­ly deep, cooked all-day col­or. Next, it gives the chili an uniden­ti­fi­able depth of fla­vor that’s both com­plex and com­fort­ing. And last, the addi­tion of cocoa pow­der cre­ates the per­fect hearty, slight­ly thick chili con­sis­ten­cy I love so much.
  4. So, add the long list of ingre­di­ents to the pot, give it a good stir, cov­er and place in the oven on 250° to 300° for 4–6 hours.
  5. It’s okay to check the chili about halfway through the cook­ing process because you want to make sure the beans still have enough cook­ing liq­uid as they con­tin­ue to cook and soft­en.
  6. Once the beans are ten­der, taste the chili and add addi­tion­al salt and pep­per if need­ed.
  7. Serve
Notes
  1. * start by adding 3 c water and check halfway through cook­ing time to see if the beans require addi­tion­al water.
Adapt­ed from Food for a Year
beta
calo­ries
415
fat
8g
pro­tein
49g
carbs
33g
more
Adapt­ed from Food for a Year
Food for a Year: https://foodforayear.com/

In true show & tell form: "I am open for questions & comments"

 
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