Fresh Blackberry Syrup and Simple French Toast

Black­ber­ries are one of my favorite sum­mer fruits and fresh­ly picked Pacif­ic North­west black­ber­ries are about the very best a that black­ber­ry could ever hope to be. To me, a bowl of sweet black­ber­ries with a sprin­kle of sug­ar is about as good as it gets. So, turn­ing some per­fect Pacif­ic North­west black­ber­ries into a sim­ple syrup seems like a good thing to do. Then pour­ing that syrup over some home­made French toast seems like an even bet­ter thing to do.

So let’s get to it and make some French toast and Black­ber­ry syrup.

Start off by grab­bing a loaf of sliced cin­na­mon bread. At the Orcas Island Mar­ket, I have found a brand of cin­na­mon bread that has a lay­er of streusel top­ping and a pow­dered sug­ar glaze that’s so tasty. Using a great brand of cin­na­mon toast, some fresh sweet black­ber­ries and a few min­utes to cook are all that’s need­ed to accom­plish a per­fect break­fast.

In a large bowl, whisk togeth­er eggs, milk, cream, sug­ar and a pinch of salt.

Place a pat of but­ter on an elec­tric grid­dle and heat to 325°or place but­ter in a large skil­let and heat over medi­um/medi­um-high flame. 

While the griddle/skillet is heat­ing, dip cin­na­mon bread slices in the egg mix­ture, 15–30 sec­onds per side.

Shake off excess egg and place the bread on the hot sur­face. Cook for two min­utes and then flip and con­tin­ue cook­ing an addi­tion­al 2 min­utes. Be sure to keep a close eye — the toast can burn eas­i­ly. ((If the toast begins to burn, reduce the heat.))

While the toast is cook­ing, place the black­ber­ries in a medi­um saucepan along with water, a pat of but­ter, sug­ar and a pinch of salt. Sim­mer on medium/low flame until the liq­uid is reduced by half and the berries have released their juices.

To thick­en, you can either add more water and con­tin­ue sim­mer­ing to reduce the liq­uid again by half or you can add a slur­ry of water and corn­starch. For time’s sake I added a corn­starch slur­ry. To keep from form­ing lumps, I removed a lit­tle of the hot black­ber­ry juice and whisked the corn­starch into it before adding it to the syrup.

Once all of the toast as been cooked and the syrup is thick­ened, it’s time to serve.

Fresh Black­ber­ry Syrup & Sim­ple French Toast
Serves 8
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
346 calo­ries
49 g
120 g
12 g
11 g
6 g
224 g
400 g
22 g
0 g
5 g
Nutri­tion Facts
Serv­ing Size
224g
Serv­ings
8
Amount Per Serv­ing
Calo­ries 346
Calo­ries from Fat 107
% Dai­ly Val­ue *
Total Fat 12g
19%
Sat­u­rat­ed Fat 6g
30%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyun­sat­u­rat­ed Fat 2g
Monoun­sat­u­rat­ed Fat 3g
Cho­les­terol 120mg
40%
Sodi­um 400mg
17%
Total Car­bo­hy­drates 49g
16%
Dietary Fiber 3g
14%
Sug­ars 22g
Pro­tein 11g
Vit­a­min A
11%
Vit­a­min C
13%
Cal­ci­um
25%
Iron
15%
* Per­cent Dai­ly Val­ues are based on a 2,000 calo­rie diet. Your Dai­ly Val­ues may be high­er or low­er depend­ing on your calo­rie needs.
French Toast
  1. 16 slices of cin­na­mon bread
  2. 4 eggs
  3. 1/2 c cream
  4. 2 c milk
  5. 3 T sug­ar
  6. pinch of sea salt
  7. 2 T but­ter
Black­ber­ry Syrup
  1. 1 pint fresh black­ber­ries, rinsed
  2. 1/2 c sug­ar
  3. 1/2 c water, plus 2 T*
  4. 2 pinch­es of sea salt
  5. 2 T but­ter, I always use salt­ed
  6. 1/2 t corn­starch
Instruc­tions
  1. In a large mix­ing bowl, com­bine eggs, cream, milk, sug­ar and salt. Whisk until smooth.
  2. Pre­heat elec­tric grid­dle or large skil­let to 325° or over medi­um/medi­um-high flame.
  3. Melt but­ter in the hot skillet/griddle.
  4. Place bread slices (one or two are a time) into the egg mix­ture for 15–30 sec­onds per side. Tap off excess egg and place on the griddle/skillet. Cook for 2 min­utes per side, keep­ing a close eye to pre­vent burn­ing. If the out­side becomes too dark before the cen­ter is cooked, reduce the heat accord­ing­ly. Repeat until all French toast is cooked. To keep cooked French toast warm until ser­vice, either place on a cook­ing sheet into a 250° oven or set aside and rewarm on the grid­dle or skil­let.
  5. While toast is cook­ing, com­bine black­ber­ries, sug­ar, water, salt & but­ter. Sim­mer over medi­um flame until liq­uid is reduced by half and the berries have released their juices. ((I don’t mash the berries — this reduces the amount of seeds vis­i­ble in the syrup.))
  6. Sim­mer on medium/low flame until the liq­uid is reduced by half and the berries have released their juices.
  7. To thick­en, you can either add more water and con­tin­ue sim­mer­ing to reduce the liq­uid again by half or you can add a slur­ry of water and corn­starch (this is where the 2 T of water come into play)). For time’s sake I added a corn­starch slur­ry. To keep from form­ing lumps, I removed a lit­tle of the hot black­ber­ry juice and whisked the corn­starch into it, then added 2 more T of water stirred and added the mix­ture back to the syrup.
  8. Once all of the toast as been cooked and the syrup is thick­ened, it’s time to serve.
  9. Serve French toast by top­ping with the black­ber­ry syrup.
  10. Serves 8
Notes
  1. *may add more to reach desired thick­ness depend­ing on the amount of juices the black­ber­ries release.
Adapt­ed from Food for a Year
beta
calo­ries
346
fat
12g
pro­tein
11g
carbs
49g
more
Adapt­ed from Food for a Year
Food for a Year: https://foodforayear.com/
The fla­vor of the crisp, but­tery French toast ((with the per­fect amount of cin­na­mon thanks to Green­lee)) when com­bined with thresh Pacif­ic North­west black­ber­ries is a blast of grandma’s kitchen and a favorite neigh­bor­hood  Parisian break­fast bak­ery. All that on one plate — from your own kitchen while still in your pj’s! Who could ask for any­thing more?!

In true show & tell form: "I am open for questions & comments"

 
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