Ten Herb Grilled Chicken — ’tis the season

It’s start­ing to get hot out­side, the days are grow­ing longer & all sorts of green things are leaf­ing out in my gar­dens. All three of those facts com­bine to form the per­fect oppor­tu­ni­ty to grill 10 herb mar­i­nat­ed chick­en. Are you won­der­ing if I real­ly used ten dif­fer­ent herbs?

Well, I actu­al­ly did!

How many can you iden­ti­fy?

How about if I lay them out?

Here’s the list of herbs I used:

  • Ital­ian pars­ley
  • curly pars­ley 
  • Eng­lish thyme
  • kitchen thyme
  • orange mint
  • choco­late mint
  • sage
  • chives
  • cilantro
  • trail­ing rose­mary 
  • upright rose­mary
  • Greek oregano

Well, that’s actu­al­ly 12. But, not count­ing the mul­ti­ple vari­eties of rose­mary and thyme, 10 herbs were used!

I grow every­thing except the cilantro & curly pars­ley. Grow­ing herbs is the way to go — espe­cial­ly for expen­sive herbs like rose­mary, thyme, oregano etc. Herbs are so easy to grow, requir­ing very — lit­tle except a sun­ny spot, qual­i­ty soil and reg­u­lar water­ing. Whether you grow them on your deck in a pot or in your flower bed next to your hedge and orna­men­tals — you’ll be so glad you have them on hand come din­ner­time!

Depend­ing on the zone you live in and the vari­ety of herb — many herbs will return year after year.

I’m also grow­ing 4 vari­eties of basil and 2 vari­eties of dill. How­ev­er, the basil is not ready to be har­vest­ed and the dill is so strong, I knew it would over­take the oth­er more mild herb fla­vors.

For this mari­nade, I also added parmi­giano reg­giano, gar­lic, lemon (zest + juice) and jalapeño (seeds and all).

Once all of the ingre­di­ents are com­bined in the food proces­sor, add 2–3 tea­spoons of salt and 1 tea­spoon of pep­per.   As you can see, I didn’t wor­ry about remov­ing the green, ten­der stems. How­ev­er, I did remove the woody stems (from the rose­mary, oregano and thyme).

Driz­zle 1 c olive oil (or canola) into the bowl of the food proces­sor and pulse to com­bine.

Isn’t that col­or gor­geous?

I found the most gigan­tic chick­en breasts at Sprouts this week­end. Rather than leav­ing them whole, I (I mean hub­by) cut them into 3″ chunks. That allowed the mari­nade to cov­er more sur­face area for max­i­mum fla­vor.

I reserved one cup of mari­nade to use as a dip­ping sauce, tossed the chick­en to coat. Cov­er and refrig­er­ate until grill-time; 4 hours to overnight is a good range of time for a chick­en mari­nade.

All that’s left is to grill, serve and eat!

I love how green those herbs stayed even after grilling.

So fla­vor­ful & juicy. The first herb I noticed when test­ing the salt (before pour­ing over the chick­en) was rose­mary. But after the chick­en mari­nad­ed and was grilled, the fla­vors all blend­ed togeth­er into a bright, uni­ver­sal her­bi­ness (is that real­ly a word, um no) with a pop of lemon + gar­lic and just the right punch of heat — thanks to the jalapeño.

Thanks to the parmi­giano reg­giano the herb mari­nade seemed to stick nice­ly to the chick­en while grilling, cre­at­ing a crisp out­er coat­ing. SO SO GOOD.

So, I leave you with these sim­ple sum­mer instruc­tions ‘Go, Grow and Grill’ — it will make for a hap­py sum­mer.

10 Herb Grilled Chick­en
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Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
  1. 3 (packed) c of herbs, rinsed and dried*
  2. 1 lemon, juiced & rest­ed
  3. 3 cloves of gar­lic
  4. 1 medi­um jalapeño, stem removed
  5. 4 oz parmi­giano reg­giano
  6. 1 c oil**
  7. 4 lbs bone­less skin­less chick­en breast
  1. Com­bine all mari­nade ingre­di­ents (every­thing but the chick­en because that would be so gross) in the bowl on a food proces­sor. Pulse to com­bine, allow­ing every­thing to be fine­ly chopped.
  2. In a large glass bowl, com­bine chick­en and mari­nade *be sure to reserve one cup of the mari­nade for a dip­ping sauce lat­er*.
  3. Cov­er the chick­en (and reserved mari­nade) and refrig­er­ate 4 hours up to over night.
  4. Pre­pare the grill for grilling chick­en and grill as usu­al.
  5. Serve with a side of the herb mari­nade for dip­ping, if desired.
  6. The mari­nade can be stored in the fridge, in a lid­ded jar, for up to 10 days.
  1. *I used a com­bi­na­tion of the fol­low­ing :: Ital­ian pars­ley, curly pars­ley, Eng­lish thyme, kitchen thyme, orange mint, choco­late mint, sage, chives, cilantro, trail­ing rose­mary, upright rose­mary, Greek oregano. Use what­ev­er you pre­fer. I was heavy on the pars­ley and cilantro — lighter on the rose­mary. Be sure to remove any woody stems before adding to the food proces­sor.
  2. **olive oil or canola works. I pre­fer canola for grilling.
Food for a Year: https://foodforayear.com/

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